Preventative Maintenance Enables Mass Finishing Equipment to Go the Extra Mile

Mass finishing machines are workhorses of industrial finishing operations, combining engineering expertise and often a hefty price tag. When preformed according to manufacturer recommendations, preventative maintenance can make a big difference in the length of time between design and decommissioning.

Not convinced? Think of your mass finishing equipment like a vehicle. What would happen if you never checked the air pressure in your tires, changed the oil, or replaced the brake pads? Eventually your vehicle would leave you stranded on the side of the road through no fault of its own.

Mass finishing equipment manufactured by a proven expert such as Rosler is just the same as a vehicle that didn’t get the care it deserved. Without preventative maintenance, your high-dollar investment will break down. However, by performing preventative maintenance according to the manufacturer’s recommendations, your equipment will operate like a well-cared for vehicle, extending the life and return on your initial investment.

Diesel or unleaded fuel, anti-lock or drum brakes, manual transmission or automatic, preventative maintenance varies by vehicle type. Here are considerations for preventative maintenance based on your specific mass finishing equipment type.

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Specifying Polyurethane Qualities Produces Mass Finishing Success

Polyurethane (PU) is an elastomer mix (urethane) material that can be formed into in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and hardnesses. Its uses range from insulation and cushioning to adhesives and car parts and more. PU’s unique ability to withstand tension and compression while maintaining its shape and flexibility makes it a great lining for mass finishing equipment.

The ability to specify the size, shape, and hardness of PU allows equipment manufacturers like Rosler Metal Finishing to build machinery with custom inserts and linings to protect components and enable precise surface finishing as well as relining existing equipment with upgraded lining.

Our expert engineers create a custom blend of shore hardness, PU type, and forming method to produce durable and resilient materials that can withstand the harsh demands and stresses found within mass finishing operations.

Measuring Material Hardness

The shore hardness of PU is measured by the material’s resistance to localized deformation. This hardness or durometer is identified with a durometer tester, which forces a conical shaped indicator into the surface of the material and then measures the depth of the indentation. The scale ranges from 0-100 durometer with many different properties in between.

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Part 2 – Aerospace Applications for Vibratory Finishing

Vibratory tub finishing is a great alternative to manual surface finishing for the aerospace industry.

From engine components and wings to landing gear, properly designed vibratory tubs can accommodate unwieldy work pieces, reduce production times and back logs, and produce a more consistent finish than manual finishing processes.

Our last blog post provided an overview of vibratory finishing’s role in the aerospace industry.

We now turn to specific applications and machine reports to demonstrate Rosler Metal Finishing’s vibratory finishing offerings and capabilities.

What We Offer

Vibratory tub finishing machines from Rosler can be customized to meet your unique aerospace finishing challenges.

Our most useful features include:machine2

  • Unload gates with external screening units.
  • Automatic media return.
  • Integrated rinse stations for finished work pieces.
  • Gantry systems for easy material handling of heavy, bulky parts.
  • Ergonomic equipment designs.

All Rosler tub vibrators are equipped with special vibration dampers to prevent the transfer of vibrations to the immediate environment. In order to keep the noise level below 80 dB(A), the machines are placed in special noise
protection cabins.

Continue reading Part 2 – Aerospace Applications for Vibratory Finishing

Part 1 – Vibratory Finishing Replaces Manual Finishing in Aerospace Industry

The aerospace industry  demands precision and high quality. The processes used to finish aerospace work pieces should adhere to the same rigorous demands.

Gone are the days when the surface of large structural aircraft components is frequently finished by hand. Thanks to the development of large, powerful vibratory tubs, costly manual deburring and grinding of large aircraft components can now be eliminated by highly controlled mass l finishing systems.

Finding A Better Way

Manual deburring and grinding are tedious and costly. Attempting these types of mass finishing by hand usually causes large quality fluctuations with relatively high scrap rates. Above all, manual processes demand highly skilled labor, which is especially hard to find in today’s economy and tight labor markets.

The lack of skilled labor and manual inefficiencies can lead to severe bottle necks in production and long lead times.

Continue reading Part 1 – Vibratory Finishing Replaces Manual Finishing in Aerospace Industry

Surface Finishing Guidebook for Trauma Implants

It is not surprising that trauma implants, along with other medical devices, are subject to the most stringent quality standards. Any material defect or malfunction can have catastrophic consequences for a patient.

For implants, the two key issues for manufacturers to deal with are selecting the right material and attaining the required surface finish. The finishing requirements can range from simple cleaning or deburring to surface smoothing and high-gloss polishing. Components exposed to a lot of tensile and bending stress even undergo a shot peening process to improve their fatigue life.Click here to download guidebook.

Some implants must have a textured or “rough” finish to promote osseointegration, which is the attachment of surrounding bone tissue to the implant. Other trauma implants require a very smooth surface to prevent the bone from attaching itself to the implanted material.

We’ve created another exclusive surface finishing guidebook to cover this complex topic, in which we will discuss the surface finishing needs of trauma implants and the impact finishes have on their functionality and performance. Examples of mass finishing and shot blasting applications will also be presented followed by detailed machine reports of actual applications used in the industry today.

If you are interested in sending us your parts for FREE process developmentcontact us here.

Optimized Finishing Processes Can Reduce Operational Costs

You don’t throw your media out with the waste water, so why would you purchase new mass finishing equipment or muddle through with an inefficient process when optimization can extend the life and enhance the effectiveness of your processing equipment?

Whether a result of increased production needs or in response to poor performance, optimizing your mass finishing process is a great way to reduce operational costs and lower your equipment’s total cost of ownership.

A Proactive Approach

Revising a process to meet increased production demand is a cost-effective way to not only improve your processing times and results, but also increase and prolong your equipment’s usefulness.

Let’s say production has been steadily building over time. How do you know if it’s time to evaluate the process?

Continue reading Optimized Finishing Processes Can Reduce Operational Costs

Surface Finishing Guidebook for Medical Instruments

Among the various technologies used for finishing the surface of medical instruments, mass finishing and shot blasting play a key role, not only as intermediate steps but also for placing the final, finishing touch on these components.Call to action text in case your image doesn't load.

Besides the right material selection, surface treatment is an essential component of the overall manufacturing process of medical instruments. Only high-quality surface finishes guarantee the required functionality, high sterility, corrosion resistance, and absolute reliability that most medical components require, while also providing a satin, non-glare appearance.

To cover this complex topic, we’ve created an exclusive surface finishing guidebook, specifically for medical instruments!  In this guidebook we will discuss Continue reading Surface Finishing Guidebook for Medical Instruments

Shot Blasting 101

Shot blasting is a specialized surface finishing process where small metal (or mineral) pellets, called blast media, are thrown onto the surface of a work piece at incredibly high speeds, ranging from 200-800 feet per second.  The impact on the work pieces from this process is what produces the desired surface finishing effect.

Shot blasting can help achieve surface cleaning, surface preparation, descaling, deburring, deflashing, and shot peening.

The process components of a shot blasting system include a shot blast machine, raw and finished work pieces, blast media, dust, and other byproducts.

The two most common types of shot blast machines are turbine blasting and air blasting.

Continue reading Shot Blasting 101

Centrifuge technology offers eco-friendly advantages

The mass finishing process creates waste water. This substance known as effluent must be properly processed for reuse or disposal. Centrifuge technology offers solutions for cleaning and/or recycling effluent.

Rosler offers a variety of options to process waste water including flocculation systems and the elimination of vibratory finishing sludge. Each type of waste has unique factors and considerations.

Flocculants for Water Circulation Systems

floc graph

Continue reading Centrifuge technology offers eco-friendly advantages

Mass Finishing 101

Often overlooked in the manufacturing process, mass finishing can help add value in a variety of ways.  Mass finishing can reduce or eliminate manual process steps, improve process consistency, increase throughput, reduce manual labor, and more.

Manufacturing or process engineers in a manufacturing plant do not have to be the expert that knows all the latest details and techniques of the finishing process. They do, however, need to have a good understanding of the basic mass finishing processes that can be applied.

Mass finishing describes a surface finishing method where parts are deburred, smoothed, polished, or cleaned using media (tumbling or vibratory), compounds (finishing soap), and specialized equipment.

Examples of mass finishing equipment include:

Understanding how the different process components, i.e. the machine, media, compound, water, and the incoming part all interact and influence the desired part finish is important. Each of the inputs in itself has a multitude of adjustments and parameters.

Continue reading Mass Finishing 101

Shot Blasting and Mass Finishing Surface Finishing Experts

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