Mass Finishing – Are You Ready to Meet Customer Demand in 2020?

Updating a process to meet increased production demand is a cost-effective way to not only improve your processing times and results, but also increase and prolong your equipment’s usefulness.

Let’s say production has been steadily building over time. How do you know if it’s time to evaluate the process for improvement?

Mass finishing experts suggest examining the final finish accomplished by the process and its ceramic or plastic media and compound usage. Processes in need of optimization will not achieve the desired finish in an acceptable timeframe and will use more media and compounds than necessary.

Continue reading Mass Finishing – Are You Ready to Meet Customer Demand in 2020?

AEROSPACE, PART 2 – Innovative Finishing for Aerospace components

The aerospace industry demands high repeatability and adherence to strict production tolerances. As we discovered in Aerospace, Part 1, Rosler Metal Finishing’s surface finishing technology delivers the precision needed for aerospace components both large and small.

For complicated gear components, we turn to our drag finishing systems for exact results every time.

Small to medium size structural aircraft parts

Characterized by its sturdy design and numerous technical features, Rosler Metal Finishing’s drag finishing systems are ideal for high value and sensitive parts such as aerospace components that cannot touch each other during the finishing process.

Consistent, Repeatable, Economical Surface Finishes

Equipped with a rotary carousel featuring 2 to 12 spindles to mount the parts, work pieces are “dragged” through the media mass. The rotation of both the carousel and the spindles guarantee an even treatment of the parts. Drag finishing offers a metal removal rate that is up to 40 times higher than conventional vibratory finishing.

Continue reading AEROSPACE, PART 2 – Innovative Finishing for Aerospace components

A Year in Review – Top Blog Posts from 2019

At Rosler, we believe in helping our clients in unique markets find a better way to finish and process their products. According to Grand View Research, Inc., the global structural steel market is expected to reach USD 140.4 billion by 2025. It is projected to expand at a CAGR of 5.6% during the forecast period. Increasing construction spending in emerging economies is projected to drive the demand for structural steel. Maybe that’s why our top posts this year included a series on Structural Steel. Enjoy the following recap.

5. Optimal Media Mix, Part 1 – Identifying and Maintaining Proper Levels

The best mass finishing equipment is useless without the proper media. That’s why the experienced engineers at Rosler Metal Finishing pair their quality equipment with the right type and amount of media to achieve consistent results.

Media comes in all kinds of shapes and sizes

Understanding how your machine, the work pieces it is finishing, and the selected media will interact is key to delivering an optimal finish each cycle. Doing so requires understanding why media levels are important, determining and tracking levels, and evaluating media consumption to avoid issues.

Continue reading A Year in Review – Top Blog Posts from 2019

Joint Reconstruction, Part 6 – Shot Blasting for Surface Finishing, Coating Preparation, and Increased Component Life Span

Like mass finishing, shot blasting is an exceptionally versatile surface treatment technology. Its applications range from general cleaning after casting and forging to shot peening and, even, cosmetic blasting for placing a fine, matte finish on the work pieces.

For shot blasting of orthopedic implants Rosler Metal Finishing recommends mainly air and occasionally wet blasting systems. The blast media is accelerated by compressed air and thrown at the work pieces through a blast nozzle, creating an extremely precise blast pattern compared to turbine blasting. Another advantage of air blasting is that it can be used with metallic, mineral as well as organic blast media.

These attributes and many more make this surface finishing method particularly useful in the medical industry

Continue reading Joint Reconstruction, Part 6 – Shot Blasting for Surface Finishing, Coating Preparation, and Increased Component Life Span

Aerospace, Part 1 – Cost-Effective, Mechanical Finishing for Large, Structural Aircraft Components

To this day, the surface of large structural aircraft components is frequently finished by hand. This process is not only costly, but extremely inefficient and hard to replicate with absolute conformity.

Airplane Landing Gear

Rosler Metal Finishing is changing the notion that suitable mechanical finishing equipment is not available for large, structural aerospace components by offering mass finishing technology capable of solving this problem and providing fully automatic finishing of work pieces up to 30 feet long.

We kick off our Aerospace Series with an overview of the cost-effective and mechanical finishing options Rosler offers for the Aerospace industry.

Vibratory Tubs Offer a Solution

Thanks to the development of large, powerful vibratory tubs manual deburring and grinding of large aircraft components can now be eliminated. The development of perfectly controlled mechanical finishing systems offers finishing solutions for applications where the biggest rotary vibrator, because of the size of the parts, might still be too small.

Continue reading Aerospace, Part 1 – Cost-Effective, Mechanical Finishing for Large, Structural Aircraft Components

Joint Reconstruction, Part 5 – Mass Finishing for Smooth, polished surfaces

Mass finishing is a highly versatile finishing technology that can be used for a wide variety of different surface treatment operations including those in the medical industry. Therefore, it is no surprise that mass finishing processes are utilized at practically every manufacturing stage for all kinds of orthopedic implants.

Rosler Metal Finishing has decades of experience in mass finishing. In this installment of the Joint Reconstruction Series, we will compare the various machines used to provide precise finishing for endoprosthetic manufacturers.

Examples of Mass Finishing

Mass finishing is used for a variety of joint replacement work pieces including:

  • Descaling and edge radiusing of hip stems, knee femorals, and other implants after forging or casting, e.g. lost wax or investment casting. 
  • Deburring and surface smoothing of various implants after belt or CNC grinding.
  • Final polishing of knee femorals, femoral heads, and the inside of acetabular cups to Ra = 0.8 micro inches as the last finishing stage before implantation.
Continue reading Joint Reconstruction, Part 5 – Mass Finishing for Smooth, polished surfaces

Forge & Foundry, Part 7 – Selecting a Shot Blasting Machine for Forgings, Non-Sand Castings, and Powdered Metal Components

This installment of Rosler Metal Finishing’s Forge and Foundry Series continues with shot blasting machine selection considerations for forgings, non-sand castings, and powdered metal components.

While none of these work pieces contain sand, their surfaces may show oxidization or – in the case of ferrous metals – heavy scale/rust caused by iron oxide.

All forms of oxidization must be removed to ensure that subsequent manufacturing operations such as machining, coating, and painting are economical and efficient. Poorly cleaned work pieces may cause additional processing, premature wear on milling tools and drill bits, excessive pollution within coolant systems, and inefficient adhesion of coatings and paint.

Traces of oxidation may also impact the work piece’s functionality.

Continue reading Forge & Foundry, Part 7 – Selecting a Shot Blasting Machine for Forgings, Non-Sand Castings, and Powdered Metal Components

Joint Reconstruction, Part 4 – Comparing Surface Finishing Methods

Shot blasting and mass finishing have become indispensable technologies for surface preparation and finishing of joint reconstruction implants. Their applications range from surface cleaning, deburring, edge radiusing after forging, casting, additive manufacturing, and machining to surface preparation for different kinds of coatings, shot peening for increasing the longevity of an implant, and placing an extremely smooth, high-gloss finish on the implants before they are inserted into the body.

Rosler Metal Finishing leverages its extensive experience in the medical industry to create customized solutions and equipment for the treatment of joint reconstruction implants.

This installment of the Joint Reconstruction Series will compare the working principles and features of utilizing shot blasting and mass finishing technologies for endoprosthetic implants.

Continue reading Joint Reconstruction, Part 4 – Comparing Surface Finishing Methods

Forge & Foundry, Part 6 – Selecting a Shot Blasting Machine for Die Castings

Our Forge and Foundry Series continues with tips for selecting a shot blasting machine for die castings.

Considerations for machine selection include:

  • Are the work pieces sturdy enough to allow for somewhat more aggressive processing or must they be handled gently without any part-on-part contact?
  • Is batch processing possible or must it be continuous?
  • Which work piece handling system is best: rotary drum, troughed belt, wire mesh belt, or overhead monorail system?
  • Can the work pieces be handled by robot, etc.?

Rosler Metal Finishing builds shot blasting machines that are designed to expertly prepare the surface of delicate and sturdy die castings and everything in between. We can design a machine that is perfectly matched to your work piece and process.

Continue reading Forge & Foundry, Part 6 – Selecting a Shot Blasting Machine for Die Castings

Joint Reconstruction, Part 3 – Surface Finishing Standards

While choosing the right implant material is of utmost importance, as discussed in our previous Joint Reconstruction Series post, the significance of optimum surface treatment throughout the entire implant manufacturing process cannot be overstated.

This relates not only to the right surface finish – be it a high-gloss polish for low friction, a textured surface for easy osseointegration, or as preparation for subsequent coating, rounded edges, etc. – but also total compliance with the specified tight dimensional tolerances. The success of a joint implant is determined by the perfect match between the various implant components. This depends, to a large extent, on the surface treatment procedure(s).

With extensive experience in the medical industry, Rosler Metal Finishing is an expert in designing systems and solutions for the treatment of joint reconstruction implants utilizing shot blasting and mass finishing technologies.

Our Joint Reconstruction Series continues with an overview of the stringent finishing standards for endoprosthetic implants.

Continue reading Joint Reconstruction, Part 3 – Surface Finishing Standards

Shot Blasting and Mass Finishing Surface Finishing Experts

%d bloggers like this: