Centrifuge Technology Processes Effluent for Reuse and Disposal

In order to achieve the lowest total cost of ownership and the greatest process efficiency, recycling process water used in mass finishing processes is key. Reusing water not only reduces costs in the form of less consumables used, but also enables companies to reduce their discharge and disposal fees by replacing process water less often and complying with water and waste regulations.pollutant table

Waste water from mass finishing applications is often referred to as effluent and must be cleaned for recycling or discharge.

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Waste Water Recycling – Centrifuge Technology Offers Cost, Environmental Savings

Mass finishing techniques are often used to uniformly prepare and finish work-pieces, but the compounds and liquids used to remove fines and other debris from work-pieces must be dealt with to ensure a repeatable process application. Cleaning and/or recycling waste water produced in the mass finishing process is easily achieved with centrifuge technology and provides opportunities to be more environmentally responsible and save money in the form of reduced labor and materials (cleaning agents and compounds).

How Centrifuges Work

In a centrifuge, waste materials including media and metal fines are often referred to as effluent. The effluent to be cleaned either flows directly from the mass finishing system Continue reading Waste Water Recycling – Centrifuge Technology Offers Cost, Environmental Savings

Blast Media – Considerations when choosing

Important factors that should be considered in the selection of any blast media for a particular application is the material and chemical composition, hardness, density, shape, screen size, and, last but not least, the hardness of the component to be blasted.

Component image

The term ‘media’ as used in mechanical surface finishing refers to the free flow abrasive or non-abrasive type of media which carries out the process required on the component.

So, what can be considered and used as a blast media?

Anything! That can be projected through a blasting system.

Media Characteristics to be considered include:

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8 Considerations When Purchasing a Rotary Vibratory Machine

Buying Mass Finishing equipment, as with all investments, can be a bit overwhelming at first.   There will surely be a number of suppliers and machine types available to you.  In order to ensure you get the best value for your money we recommend you consider the following when purchasing a rotary vibratory machine:

Movement– Appearances can be deceiving, don’t be fooled into thinking all machines are the same just because the look similar.  Always test the machine and its processing ability before you buy!  Test its amplitude, see how regular the movement is, is it consistently driving the same way?

Strength and durability – Check how heavy the machine is, usually you’ll find something costs less because it is made of cheaper and lighter materials.

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THE 9 MOST COMMON MISTAKES YOU NEED TO AVOID TO GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR MASS FINISHING MACHINE

When maintained properly, mass finishing equipment can be very user friendly.

As a result sometimes operators can get into the habit of just turning them on each day and ignoring simple operating and maintenance rules.  Avoiding the following 9 mistakes that operators commonly make will help you get the most from your equipment:

  • They let the media level drop, often with the aim of saving money or so they can get more work pieces in. This changes the ratio of work pieces per media though and can affect process times, unloading ability, can cause components to damage each other, and can result in the required finish not being achievable.

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Air versus Turbine – Balancing Blasting Capabilities and Outcomes, Part 2

In addition to the pro and con evaluation of air blasting and turbine lasting found in our previous blog, these two methods can also be compared in terms of throwing velocity, applications, and industries.

In terms of throwing velocity. Media thrown by turbines immediately start losing speed the moment that the turbine blade releases it, producing higher intensity blast results closer to the turbine. Larger shot retains its speed better over a distance and is commonly used to maintain intensity while creating a larger blast pattern by positioning the turbine(s) farther away. In contrast, media thrown by air nozzles will continue to accelerate for the first 100-300 mm outside of the nozzle depending on blast pressure and media size and density until the compressed air fully dissipates to the ambient environment, meaning that your best blast results occur a distance away from the nozzle.

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Air Versus Turbine – Balancing Blasting Capabilities and Outcomes, Part 1

Blasting processes for surface finishing vary according to the size, quantity, composition, and desired finish of the work pieces in need of surface preparation. Air blasting and turbine blasting are two of the more common types of blasting. While there is some overlap between the two methods, each carries its own unique attributes and drawbacks.

When comparing these two blast methods, the number one thing to keep in mind is precision versus bulk. Air blasting provides precision surface preparation using a much smaller blast pattern compared to turbine blasting, which delivers large quantities of media over a wide blast pattern, thereby making it ideal for blasting large quantities of parts or larger individual parts.

Continue reading Air Versus Turbine – Balancing Blasting Capabilities and Outcomes, Part 1

Shot Blasting and Mass Finishing Surface Finishing Experts

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