Stainless Steel (INOX) Blast Media – Choice And Use

 

Abrasive Media
Stainless medias are of a hardness on MOH’s scale 7 – 8

It should be noted that any abrasive described as 6 and over on the MOH scale is classed as abrasive

Stainless Steel with Chrome / Nickel (Inox Cr / Ni)

This media can be used with air and turbine blasting on component parts requiring soft abrasion (new media is roundish and not so hard media).

  • This blast media has good resistance to rust and high durability
  • Particularly used on aluminium, brass, copper and alloys, stainless steel and stone slabs
  • Round particle shape allows soft abrasion effect; it has a high resistance to corrosion, avoidance of dust effects, low wearing of equipment, long life of media
  • Finer sizes will compare with a glass bead; provides a sateen finish and does not tend to figure mark as glass beaded surfaces might.

 

Stainless Steel with Chrome ( Inox Cr )

This media can be used with air and turbine blasting on component parts requiring more abrasion (new blast media is roundish in shape and rather harder media than that with Nickel).

  • This blast media has good resistance to rust and high durability
  • Particularly used on aluminium, brass, copper and alloys, stainless steel and stone slabs, but produces a slightly more abraded textured finish than that with Nickel described above
  • Round particle shape allows abraded effect; it has a high resistance to corrosion, avoidance of dust effects, low wearing of equipment, long life of media
  • Stainless chrome alloy blast media is more commercially priced

 

The more commonly used medias are:

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Haydn Kitchen New APost written by
Haydn Kitchen
Shot Blasting Technical Manager

2 thoughts on “Stainless Steel (INOX) Blast Media – Choice And Use”

  1. Hi,
    While using Glass Bead we often face a problem that you leave hand prints on the surface during handling. Is there a after treatment to avoid such marks? Also the surface is not exactly satin finish but it little bit rough. Is there particular glass bead size that needs to be used.

    1. This is a Common Problem!

      For example:
      – The oils from our hands can etch the surface of bead-blasted aluminum because it is not anodized. Material handling systems would eliminate much of the human handling.
      – Steel parts will oxidize were touched by bare hands. Using rubber gloves should help.

      Wet blasting with beads also works well but it can be very difficult to easily dry parts without leaving water spots.

      To achieve your desired finish related to your material, blast pressure and media size must be considered.

      We always recommend starting at 45-50 psi.

      Here’s a rundown of the most commonly used glass bead media grits and their characteristics:
      – 40-60 grit is considered course. Typically used to clean or deburr parts yet still leave a rougher uniform profile, course beads are typically described as aggressive.
      – 60-120 grit is considered medium grade and will leave a smoother, more satin profile while maintaining the ability to cover machining lines. This is also a common size.
      – 100-170 grit is referred to as medium to fine. It produces a fine, satin finish and is better for lighter materials.
      – 170-325 grit is known as fine finish. Producing a satin to semi-polished surface, these grits are ideal for light delicate metal. The surface substrate should be smooth prior to blasting.

      With 17 locations worldwide, we’d be happy to refer you to the closest Rosler expert to you for further explanation and a customized recomendation. Expert an email from one of our experts soon!

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