All posts by Rosler

Structural Steel FAQ, Part 12 – Material Handling Options

Imagine the ability to clean, shot peen, and paint I-beams for commercial construction, without having to move the heavy and bulky piece manually. The most well-equipped preservation line would be much less useful without adequate material handling systems.

That’s why Rosler Metal Finishing builds material handling systems into preservation lines to accommodate a wide range of structural steel components before and after the surface finishing process.

This installment of the Structural Steel FAQ Series will answer What types of material handling systems are available for shot blasting and painting structural steel components?

The most common methods of handling systems are roller conveyors and overhead rails. More specialized options also exist.

Continue reading Structural Steel FAQ, Part 12 – Material Handling Options

Forge & Foundry, Part 2 – Efficient Recycling

When a casting is produced, by-products are generated. Small pieces originating from spills, gates, runners, and risers are returned to the casting process as recycling material. To ensure a consistently high overall quality of the raw material, it is essential that this recycling material is perfectly clean without any sand, casting shell, or other residues on the surface.

Subjecting these by-products to a blast cleaning process from Rosler Metal Finishing before they are re-melted offers many advantages. Besides the resource-saving use of raw materials, the effective cleaning of the recycling material increases the uptime of the smelting furnaces by significantly reducing the amount of unwanted slag.

Components made from steel, nodular cast iron, and grey iron can be processed by mass finishing equipment.

Continue reading Forge & Foundry, Part 2 – Efficient Recycling

Structural Steel FAQ, Part 11 – Preservation Lines

Structural steel components are prone to rust quickly and fail with potentially catastrophic consequences if not covered with a suitable, protective coating.

In preparing for use in construction, shipbuilding, and the production of all kinds of heavy duty vehicles, trucks, railway vehicles, agricultural implements or construction equipment, it is important to apply proper surface finishing processes to these components for safety and longevity.

Offering painting and shot blasting in a single source, preservation lines are a great option for structural steel components including steel plates, beams, round bar stock, and tubes.

In this installment of our Structural Steel FAQ Series, Rosler Metal Finishing will answer What are the key components of a preservation line?

Continue reading Structural Steel FAQ, Part 11 – Preservation Lines

Forge & Foundry, Part 1 – Shot Blasting Systems

Getting castings and forgings ready for the subsequent processing steps presents some of the toughest surface finishing challenges. Shot blasting machines can handle all of these tasks from removing residual sand, casting shells, flashing, die marks, or scale. Whether cast iron, steel, stainless steel, super alloys, titanium, aluminum, zinc, or magnesium, the comprehensive portfolio of Rosler Metal Finishing blasting systems for the foundry industry enables the optimal process for any requirement.

Shot blasting is an essential part of most forge and foundry operations and has been used since the late 1800s. This specialized surface finishing process throws small metal (or mineral) pellets, called blast media, onto the surface of a work piece at incredibly high speeds, ranging from 200-800 feet per second. The impact on the work pieces from this process is what blasts the contaminants from the parts and produces the desired surface finishing effect.

When properly applied prior to finishing, blasting achieves three key aspects of the finishing process:

  1. Cleans and descales surfaces
  2. Creates a uniform texture on the part and blends the surface
  3. Enhances paint adhesion
Continue reading Forge & Foundry, Part 1 – Shot Blasting Systems

Structural Steel FAQ, Part 10 – Blast Rooms for Touch-Ups

When it comes to shot blasting complex weldments like the chassis for construction equipment, excavator booms, and wind power components, sometimes even the best turbine placement may not clean all the nooks and crannies of the work piece’s surface.

Surface finishing experts such as Rosler Metal Finishing have solved this issue with the addition of manual blast rooms to automatic shot blast systems.

This installment of our Structural Steel FAQ series will answer When are blast rooms behind turbine blast machines required for manual touch-up?

Continue reading Structural Steel FAQ, Part 10 – Blast Rooms for Touch-Ups

Medical Instruments, Part 3 – Adjusting Surface Finishing Alongside Medical Advances

All medical technology requires precise surface finishing to ensure safety, strength, and longevity. The specific surfacing goal and technique vary though.

From stainless steel dental drill heads that require deburring and surface smoothing to stainless steel tweezers that require surface cleaning and texturing after forging/grinding and induction welding, the specific treatments are the key to surface finishing success.

Medical Instruments, Part 3 blog - Adjusting Surface Finishing Alongside Medical Advances

In our last medical instrument blog, Rosler Metal Finishing discussed the merits of mass finishing and shot blasting for medical instruments.

This blog will address a particularly challenging form of material in need of surface finishing and answer the question: What specific surface finishing challenges are there in the medical field?

Continue reading Medical Instruments, Part 3 – Adjusting Surface Finishing Alongside Medical Advances

Spinal Implants, Part 2 – Processed to Perfection

Along with the material choice discussed in Part 1 of our Spinal Implants series, surface treatment is the most important factor affecting the functionality, performance, and longevity of spinal implants and instruments.

During the manufacturing process they may have to undergo multiple finishing operations including burr removal from previous manufacturing operations, rounding of sharp edges, general surface cleaning, surface smoothing, and, frequently, high gloss polishing.

Treatment steps can also include surface texturing/profiling and shot peening, areas Rosler Metal Finishing has extensive experience in.

This blog post will focus on the finishing requirements and challenges of spinal implants as well as the solutions provided by mass finishing and shot blasting processes and the associated costs.

Continue reading Spinal Implants, Part 2 – Processed to Perfection

Medical Instruments, Part 2 – Mass Finishing or Shot Blasting, Which Technique is Best?

The medical industry is constantly looking for better, more suitable materials that will offer greater performance and longevity for medical devices, implants, and instruments while simultaneously searching for more efficient manufacturing technologies.

When it comes to surface finishing, such newly developed materials and manufacturing processes can pose considerable technical challenges. That’s why close cooperation between the medical device manufacturers and qualified surface treatment experts is essential during the development and prototyping phase.

In our last medical instrument blog, Rosler Metal Finishing discussed the surface finishing requirements for medical instruments. This blog will dive deeper into the techniques used in surface finishing and answer the question: What is the best type of surface finishing for medical instruments?

The short answer is a combination of mass finishing and shot blasting. Guidance for a surface finishing expert can help determine the best process – typically a series of processes – for a specific medical instrument.

Continue reading Medical Instruments, Part 2 – Mass Finishing or Shot Blasting, Which Technique is Best?

Spinal Implants, Part 1 – Surgical Specifications

Technological advances in medical equipment and implants have driven worldwide spinal implant sales to $10 billion annually.

Like orthopedic implants used for joint reconstruction and the surgical fixation of a bone fracture, spinal implants are subject to very specific and strict surface finishing requirements.

Mass finishing and shot blasting play a key role in creating the right finish for spinal implants, not only for intermediate surface treatment after forging, casting, machining, additive manufacturing, etc., but also for placing the final surface finish before implantation.

Rosler Metal Finishing has extensive experience in surface finishing spinal implants using mass finishing, shot blasting, and a combination of both methods.

In a series of posts, we’ll analyze the specific surface finishing requirements for spinal implants based on their functional and performance characteristics and describe the respective mass finishing and shot blasting equipment and methods available to fulfill these requirements.

Continue reading Spinal Implants, Part 1 – Surgical Specifications

Medical Instruments, Part 1 – Surface Finishing Requirements for Medical Instruments

Rosler Metal Finishing understands that medical instruments are subject to stringent quality standards. Whether during an office visit or a complicated surgery, material defects or malfunctions may create dangerous and even fatal consequences for patients and healthcare workers alike. Providing precise and durable surface finishes  for work pieces used in the medical industry is one of our passions.

In a series of blog posts, we’ll discuss the various technologies used for finishing the surface of medical instruments and how mass finishing and shot blasting play a key role, not only as intermediate steps but also for placing the final, finishing touch on these work pieces.

We begin with a basic question: What are the surface finishing requirements associated with medical instruments?

Materials Matter

Medical instruments are exposed to frequent use and subject to highly corrosive atmospheres caused by frequent sterilization in a steam pressure chamber, exposure to chlorine wipes, and ultrasonic cleaning. They must never fail. To minimize wear and prevent corrosion most medical instruments, especially surgical tools, are made from tough, slow wearing, corrosion-resistant, high-performance metal alloys including austenitic stainless steel, titanium, or cobalt chrome.

Continue reading Medical Instruments, Part 1 – Surface Finishing Requirements for Medical Instruments