Category Archives: Mass Finishing

Centrifuge Technology, Part 5 – Potential Issues and Remedies for Water Recycling

Trial and error are often the origin of innovation. As such, mass finishing and centrifuge technology have been advanced by building upon what worked and avoiding what didn’t.

With more than 80 years of experience, Rosler has extensive engineering knowledge and troubleshooting skills. An overview of the top three issues centrifuge water recycling systems experience along with possible remedies are summarized here. As always, trust a partner such as Rosler to consult on your specific issues.   

Excess Oil in the System

Too much oil may be carried into the finishing system by the work pieces, for example, in stamping operations.

The excess oil will negatively affect the mass finishing process. The media might become “glazed” causing longer processing times and poorer finishing results. In addition, the finished work pieces may also be contaminated with oil residue.

Possible remedies include cleaning of the work pieces prior to mass finishing, for example, with an industrial washing machine, or switching to an alternative oil type that can be better emulsified by the compound for better discharge from the process water.

Continue reading Centrifuge Technology, Part 5 – Potential Issues and Remedies for Water Recycling

Mass Finishing Water & Compounds, Part 2 – Precise Water Flow, Dosing Drive Results

A number of factors contribute to mass finishing success. Machinery, consumables, compounds, and process water must be evaluated individually and as a whole to create optimal results and stable process conditions.

When considering the flow rate of compound and process water into the processing bowl of a mass finishing machine, careful calibration is required based on the machine type and size, finishing task, condition of the raw work pieces, and process water conditions.

For example, high‐energy machines require a much higher flow rate than vibratory finishing systems. Similarly, work pieces heavily contaminated with oil, grease, and/or dirt require more compound and water than less contaminated work pieces.

Water flow and compound dosing rates are usually determined by processing trials in the test lab of the equipment supplier. Once a finishing process has been defined, the user must make sure that the established water and compound flow parameters are precisely maintained. This requires a well-calibrated and well-maintained dosing system.

At Rosler, we draw upon more than 80 years of worldwide experience to create and maintain effective mass finishing systems and deliver precise results. Our ability to do so is thanks, in part, to understanding the importance of water flow and compound dosing.

Continue reading Mass Finishing Water & Compounds, Part 2 – Precise Water Flow, Dosing Drive Results

Mass Finishing Water & Compounds, Part 1 – Identifying, Correcting Hard and Soft Water Issues

Achieving the desired surface conditions in a mass finishing process requires the machinery, consumables, compounds, and process water to work together in a balanced manner. Independent of the other process elements, the process water itself must be evaluated for hard and soft water issues.

Rosler has more than six decades of experience designing mass finishing machinery, supplying consumables and compounds, and developing processes. Understanding the ramifications of too hard or too soft process water is a key to our success.

Classifications and Measurements

Depending on its geological source, the water used in mass finishing processes may have varying mineral content levels, specifically calcium and magnesium carbonates, bicarbonates, and sulfates. A high amount of mineral content is used to classify the water as “hard”, whereas low mineral content classifies it as “soft”.

Continue reading Mass Finishing Water & Compounds, Part 1 – Identifying, Correcting Hard and Soft Water Issues

Centrifuge Technology, Part 4 – Pre-Conditions and Consumables Enhance Process Efficiency

Establishing and maintaining an effective and cost-efficient process water recycling system requires consideration of a few essential points. Without the proper compounds, additives, and monitoring, even a well-designed piece of centrifuge technology is bound to falter and, eventually, fail.

Rosler has extensive experience in mass finishing, including designing and manufacturing equipment, fine-tuning processes, and supplying the right consumables for a variety of processes. With our knowledge, preconditions and consumables can be calibrated for maximum process efficiency.

Special Recycling Compounds

Mass finishing compounds fulfill numerous tasks such as degreasing/de-oiling work pieces, burnishing/brightening surfaces, and providing a temporary corrosion protection. Above all though, the primary task of the compounds is to keep the media and work pieces clean to achieve the desired finishing goals and keep the mass finishing process stable.

Continue reading Centrifuge Technology, Part 4 – Pre-Conditions and Consumables Enhance Process Efficiency

Centrifuge Technology, Part 3 – Mechanics and Limitations of Water Recycling

Combining the direction of rotation and centrifugal force, Rosler’s centrifuge technology takes advantage of the weight difference between the liquid phase and the solids in the process water to separate “dirty” solid particles from clean, reusable process water.

The effectiveness of this technology lies in the centrifugal force that is created. For example, a modern fighter jet develops a G-force of about 10-15 while a high-speed centrifuge drum generates a force of more than 2,000 G.

The physics of centrifuge technology combined with mass finishing equipment creates efficient and ecologically sound manufacturing processes, albeit with some key limitations.

Collection by Force

The solids, primarily consisting of media and, to a lesser degree, of metal fines from the work pieces, found within “dirty” process water are heavier than the water itself. As the drum spins, heavier solids are deposited on the drum wall in the form of sludge, whereas the lighter-weight liquid remains on the inside of the drum. With the addition of special cleaning additives known as flocculants, even oil carried into the mass finishing process can be removed from the process water.

Continue reading Centrifuge Technology, Part 3 – Mechanics and Limitations of Water Recycling

Polishing Processes Benefit from Pre-tumbled Media

Media selection is key in any surface finishing process since these consumables are essential “precision tools” required to achieve the specified finishing results.

Whether you are developing a new mass finishing process or changing process parameters including different work pieces, process times, and requirements, partnering with an experienced expert will help you in evaluating all process parameters.

With decades of experience developing mass finishing machines and manufacturing media and compounds, Rosler is an excellent source for guidance. In some cases, pre-tumbled media may be suggested.

What is Pre-tumbled Media?

After production, some types of pre-polishing and polishing media are pre-tumbled by the manufacturer. This process breaks sharp points and corners off individual media pieces to create smoother edges.

Continue reading Polishing Processes Benefit from Pre-tumbled Media

Centrifuge Technology, Part 2 – Operational and Economic Benefits of Recycling Process Water

During mass finishing, the process water injected into the finishing machine is contaminated with the chemical ingredients of the compounds, fines from the grinding or polishing media, and metal fines from the work pieces.

In case of ball burnishing, when acidic or alkaline compounds are used, the process water can also contain dissolved metals or be alkaline or acidic. Or, for example, when the work pieces are covered with oil from machining or stamping operations, the water can even be contaminated with oil.

Rosler has developed a series of closed-loop, water circulation systems using centrifuge technology to remove these contaminants regardless of their origin and allow clean process water to be reused and/or safely discharged. In addition to offering more effective work piece processing, cleaning process water saves money and the environment through reduced consumption, compound usage, disposal costs, and regulations.

Rosler diagram of mass finishing input and output
Mass finishing input and output
Continue reading Centrifuge Technology, Part 2 – Operational and Economic Benefits of Recycling Process Water

Avoid Media Glazing to Prevent Process Inefficiencies, Breakdown

Media plays an essential role within a mass finishing process. Whether ceramic, plastic, or polishing and drying, optimal media mix and conditions must be maintained to produce precise finishing results.

“Glazing” occurs when the surface of the media becomes contaminated with metal fines and other debris from the work pieces. As a result, the media becomes very shiny and frequently looks like a piece of aluminum, brass, steel, zinc, etc.

Because glazed media completely loses its original surface properties, it no longer has any grinding effect. Instead, glazed media creates a sort of uncontrolled burnishing. It also retains dirt and other particles which are then deposited on the work pieces.

The image above depicts (from left) media states include clean, heavily glazed, partially cleaned, and fully cleaned.

Rosler has more than 60 years of media production experience. In that time we’ve seen—and corrected—countless examples of ineffective surface finishing as a result of media glazing.

Continue reading Avoid Media Glazing to Prevent Process Inefficiencies, Breakdown

Centrifuge Technology, Part 1 – Water Cleaning Systems Replace Outdated Methods

Before the “dirty” process water coming from a mass finishing operation can be discharged to sewage, it must be cleaned to meet the legal discharge limits for hazardous materials. Likewise, for cycling the water back to the mass finishing process, the process water must also be cleaned. Uncleaned process water would cause a mass finishing process to collapse very quickly.

Rosler has more than 80 years of surface finishing expertise. In that time, we’ve developed countless efficiencies in both the design of our equipment and the processes they support. Centrifuge technology has long been an effective and cost-efficient tool, not only for cleaning the process water, but also for reusing it for the actual mass finishing operation.

Previous Cleaning Methods

To a large extent, this technology has replaced traditional waste water cleaning methods. Until recently, the most common cleaning systems for mass finishing applications were settlement tanks and flocculation (“floc & drop”) systems.

Continue reading Centrifuge Technology, Part 1 – Water Cleaning Systems Replace Outdated Methods

Mass Finishing Media, Part 3 – Why Discharging Undersized Media, Maintaining Media Levels Are Crucial

Mass finishing processes are effective because the motion of media against work pieces transforms the surface of the work pieces. The deflashing, descaling, edge rounding, polishing/smoothing, cleaning/oil removal/degreasing, and/or grinding effects change the surface of the media itself along with the work pieces.

As a result, media wears down over time, losing its shape, size, and effectiveness. Known as undersized media, this worn media must be discharged and replaced with fresh media to ensure proper processing and safety.

Whether a process uses ceramic, plastic, or polishing and drying media, Rosler stresses the importance of monitoring media levels and the mix of new and worn media for precise and safe mass finishing results.

Continue reading Mass Finishing Media, Part 3 – Why Discharging Undersized Media, Maintaining Media Levels Are Crucial