Category Archives: Mass Finishing

Automotive Crankshafts, Part 1 – Cost-Effective Surface Improvement for Key Engine Components

Crankshafts are a key component of internal combustion engines, be it mass-produced engines for motorcycles and automobiles, engines for heavy trucks, off-high highway equipment, and even large ships.

Crankshafts convert the reciprocating (up/down) movement of the pistons/connecting rods into a rotational movement that drives the wheels and allows a vehicle to move forward.

Rosler Metal Finishing understands the vital importance of these engine components and has developed specific shot blasting and mass finishing machines to process these pieces to perfection.

A crankshaft with connected rods and pistons
A crankshaft with connected rods and pistons

Materials & Production Methods

Considering that automotive crankshafts weigh around 40-60 pounds and rotate approximately 100 times per second, these parts are exposed to tremendous tensile, compressive, and shear stresses. In addition, combustion forces and piston acceleration in an engine can also cause significant vibration.

Therefore, crankshafts must be made from tough, wear-resistant materials, usually high alloy carbon steel. Typical alloying elements are manganese, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, cobalt, or vanadium.

Continue reading Automotive Crankshafts, Part 1 – Cost-Effective Surface Improvement for Key Engine Components

Spinal Implants, Part 3 – Mass Finishing Versus Shot Blasting Methods

implanted spinal rods
Implanted spinal rods

With worldwide sales at nearly $10 billion annually, there is a high demand for spinal implants. These implants are subject to very specific and strict surface finishing requirements to ensure longevity and fixation to bone.

Mass finishing and shot blasting play key roles in creating the right finish for spinal implants, not only for intermediate surface treatment after forging, casting, machining, additive manufacturing, etc., but also for placing the final surface finish before implantation.

Let’s examine the capabilities of mass finishing and shot blasting for spinal implants and how Rosler Metal Finishing can develop a precise and repeatable finishing process to meet your unique challenges and goals.

Continue reading Spinal Implants, Part 3 – Mass Finishing Versus Shot Blasting Methods

Mass Finishing – Are You Ready to Meet Customer Demand in 2020?

Updating a process to meet increased production demand is a cost-effective way to not only improve your processing times and results, but also increase and prolong your equipment’s usefulness.

Let’s say production has been steadily building over time. How do you know if it’s time to evaluate the process for improvement?

Mass finishing experts suggest examining the final finish accomplished by the process and its ceramic or plastic media and compound usage. Processes in need of optimization will not achieve the desired finish in an acceptable timeframe and will use more media and compounds than necessary.

Continue reading Mass Finishing – Are You Ready to Meet Customer Demand in 2020?

AEROSPACE, PART 2 – Innovative Finishing for Aerospace components

The aerospace industry demands high repeatability and adherence to strict production tolerances. As we discovered in Aerospace, Part 1, Rosler Metal Finishing’s surface finishing technology delivers the precision needed for aerospace components both large and small.

For complicated gear components, we turn to our drag finishing systems for exact results every time.

Small to medium size structural aircraft parts

Characterized by its sturdy design and numerous technical features, Rosler Metal Finishing’s drag finishing systems are ideal for high value and sensitive parts such as aerospace components that cannot touch each other during the finishing process.

Consistent, Repeatable, Economical Surface Finishes

Equipped with a rotary carousel featuring 2 to 12 spindles to mount the parts, work pieces are “dragged” through the media mass. The rotation of both the carousel and the spindles guarantee an even treatment of the parts. Drag finishing offers a metal removal rate that is up to 40 times higher than conventional vibratory finishing.

Continue reading AEROSPACE, PART 2 – Innovative Finishing for Aerospace components

Aerospace, Part 1 – Cost-Effective, Mechanical Finishing for Large, Structural Aircraft Components

To this day, the surface of large structural aircraft components is frequently finished by hand. This process is not only costly, but extremely inefficient and hard to replicate with absolute conformity.

Airplane Landing Gear

Rosler Metal Finishing is changing the notion that suitable mechanical finishing equipment is not available for large, structural aerospace components by offering mass finishing technology capable of solving this problem and providing fully automatic finishing of work pieces up to 30 feet long.

We kick off our Aerospace Series with an overview of the cost-effective and mechanical finishing options Rosler offers for the Aerospace industry.

Vibratory Tubs Offer a Solution

Thanks to the development of large, powerful vibratory tubs manual deburring and grinding of large aircraft components can now be eliminated. The development of perfectly controlled mechanical finishing systems offers finishing solutions for applications where the biggest rotary vibrator, because of the size of the parts, might still be too small.

Continue reading Aerospace, Part 1 – Cost-Effective, Mechanical Finishing for Large, Structural Aircraft Components

Joint Reconstruction, Part 5 – Mass Finishing for Smooth, polished surfaces

Mass finishing is a highly versatile finishing technology that can be used for a wide variety of different surface treatment operations including those in the medical industry. Therefore, it is no surprise that mass finishing processes are utilized at practically every manufacturing stage for all kinds of orthopedic implants.

Rosler Metal Finishing has decades of experience in mass finishing. In this installment of the Joint Reconstruction Series, we will compare the various machines used to provide precise finishing for endoprosthetic manufacturers.

Examples of Mass Finishing

Mass finishing is used for a variety of joint replacement work pieces including:

  • Descaling and edge radiusing of hip stems, knee femorals, and other implants after forging or casting, e.g. lost wax or investment casting. 
  • Deburring and surface smoothing of various implants after belt or CNC grinding.
  • Final polishing of knee femorals, femoral heads, and the inside of acetabular cups to Ra = 0.8 micro inches as the last finishing stage before implantation.
Continue reading Joint Reconstruction, Part 5 – Mass Finishing for Smooth, polished surfaces

Joint Reconstruction, Part 4 – Comparing Surface Finishing Methods

Shot blasting and mass finishing have become indispensable technologies for surface preparation and finishing of joint reconstruction implants. Their applications range from surface cleaning, deburring, edge radiusing after forging, casting, additive manufacturing, and machining to surface preparation for different kinds of coatings, shot peening for increasing the longevity of an implant, and placing an extremely smooth, high-gloss finish on the implants before they are inserted into the body.

Rosler Metal Finishing leverages its extensive experience in the medical industry to create customized solutions and equipment for the treatment of joint reconstruction implants.

This installment of the Joint Reconstruction Series will compare the working principles and features of utilizing shot blasting and mass finishing technologies for endoprosthetic implants.

Continue reading Joint Reconstruction, Part 4 – Comparing Surface Finishing Methods

Joint Reconstruction, Part 2 – Material Standards

Joint reconstruction implants allow millions of individuals to regain mobility and reduce pain. Just as surgical skill is required to implant these artificial joints, so is skillful construction and finish of the joint components themselves.

A leader in surface finishing for medical technology, Rosler Metal Finishing has extensive experience in shot blasting and mass finishing a wide range of medical devices from instruments to implants used specifically for joint replacement.

Our Joint Reconstruction Series continues with an overview of the most common materials used for these endoprosthetic implants.

Material Standards

The most common materials used for joint reconstruction implants are currently titanium and titanium alloys and cobalt-chromium alloys. Both materials are very tough, corrosion-resistant, highly biocompatible, and have proven themselves to be absolutely reliable.

Continue reading Joint Reconstruction, Part 2 – Material Standards

Forge & Foundry, Part 1 – Shot Blasting Systems

Getting castings and forgings ready for the subsequent processing steps presents some of the toughest surface finishing challenges. Shot blasting machines can handle all of these tasks from removing residual sand, casting shells, flashing, die marks, or scale. Whether cast iron, steel, stainless steel, super alloys, titanium, aluminum, zinc, or magnesium, the comprehensive portfolio of Rosler Metal Finishing blasting systems for the foundry industry enables the optimal process for any requirement.

Shot blasting is an essential part of most forge and foundry operations and has been used since the late 1800s. This specialized surface finishing process throws small metal (or mineral) pellets, called blast media, onto the surface of a work piece at incredibly high speeds, ranging from 200-800 feet per second. The impact on the work pieces from this process is what blasts the contaminants from the parts and produces the desired surface finishing effect.

When properly applied prior to finishing, blasting achieves three key aspects of the finishing process:

  1. Cleans and descales surfaces
  2. Creates a uniform texture on the part and blends the surface
  3. Enhances paint adhesion
Continue reading Forge & Foundry, Part 1 – Shot Blasting Systems

Spinal Implants, Part 2 – Processed to Perfection

Along with the material choice discussed in Part 1 of our Spinal Implants series, surface treatment is the most important factor affecting the functionality, performance, and longevity of spinal implants and instruments.

During the manufacturing process they may have to undergo multiple finishing operations including burr removal from previous manufacturing operations, rounding of sharp edges, general surface cleaning, surface smoothing, and, frequently, high gloss polishing.

Treatment steps can also include surface texturing/profiling and shot peening, areas Rosler Metal Finishing has extensive experience in.

This blog post will focus on the finishing requirements and challenges of spinal implants as well as the solutions provided by mass finishing and shot blasting processes and the associated costs.

Continue reading Spinal Implants, Part 2 – Processed to Perfection