Category Archives: Shot Blasting

Forge & Foundry, Part 1 – Shot Blasting Systems

Preparing castings and forgings ready for the subsequent processing steps presents some of the toughest surface finishing challenges. Shot blasting machines can handle all of these tasks from removing residual sand, casting shells, flashing, die marks, or scale.

Whether cast iron, steel, stainless steel, super alloys, titanium, aluminum, zinc, or magnesium, the comprehensive portfolio of Rosler blasting systems for the forge and foundry industries can develop the optimal process for any requirement.

Principle & Popularity

Shot blasting is an essential part of most forge and foundry operations and has been used since the late 1800s. This specialized surface finishing process throws small metal (or mineral) pellets, called blast media, onto the surface of a work piece at incredibly high speeds, ranging from 200-800 feet per second.

Continue reading Forge & Foundry, Part 1 – Shot Blasting Systems

Interlinked, Automated Shot Blast System Provides Excellent Paint Preparation

With more than 80 years of experience, Rosler has developed, installed, serviced, and provided consumables for shot blast systems for a variety of industries and applications.

When a Polish manufacturer of complex steel weldments was ready to invest in a new shot blast machine, key selection criteria included quality, capacity, high equipment uptime, and integration into the existing manufacturing flow. As an essential part of the pre-treatment operation for a cathodic painting line, the system also needed to produce optimal surface preparation results within an interlinked workflow in a 3-shift operation.

The company chose a Rosler continuous feed spinner hanger blast machine because of its wear-resistant design and favorable operating costs.

Continue reading Interlinked, Automated Shot Blast System Provides Excellent Paint Preparation

Structural Steel FAQ, Part 2 – Methods of Surface Preparation

Structural steel is a widely used material in a variety of industries due to its strength and durability. Our first post in the Structural Steel FAQ series established why this material must be prepared – namely to preserve its strength and longevity. This post will describe the type of surface preparation required before shot blasting structural steel.

In order to stand up to the harsh demands of the construction, shipbuilding, and heavy equipment industries, the most appropriate type of surface preparation must be undertaken to ensure the best shot blasting results possible.

As always, consult a surface finishing expert such as Rosler to discuss your specific components, their condition, and the desired outcome for your structural steel applications.

We turn to another FAQ about structural steel: What type of surface preparation is required prior to shot blasting?

The answer depends on the condition of the component.

Continue reading Structural Steel FAQ, Part 2 – Methods of Surface Preparation

A Holistic Look at Automated Blasting in the Modern Metal Fabrication Shop

Written by Rosler CEO Bernhard Kerschbaum, this article was originally published in The Fabricator.


Modern metal fabrication operations aren’t like the fab shops of old. Many are clean, well lit, with employees working in fresh, filtered air. Yes, some operations in fabrication are, well, just plain dirty—and manual blasting is a prime example. The work isn’t pleasant, requires protective gear, and if the booths aren’t maintained or set up properly, they can constrain workflow in a serious way.

Options in blasting automation abound, but before diving into all that technological wizardry, try laying some groundwork by answering a fundamental question: What must the blasting operation accomplish?

Shot Blasting Versus Shot Peening

Shot blasting (or just “blasting” if using a different media other than shot) prepares a metal surface while shot peening aims to change the metal’s properties (see Figure 1). Certain aerospace applications require precise levels of stress relief (or other changes to material properties), and they use specialized shot-peening technologies to achieve it. Precision shot peening of landing gears is a prime example, with the process optimizing surface stresses, eliminating microcracks and the stress risers around them.

Most metal fabricators employ blast cleaning for the vast majority of their applications, cleaning and preparing a metal surface for the next manufacturing step, usually painting. If a beam or plate isn’t blasted correctly, paint won’t adhere properly. However, some fabrication operations do employ a kind of peening—not as precise as high-end peening applications, but it’s peening nonetheless, with the media impacting the surface and causing compressive stresses that aim to change the material’s properties.

Continue reading A Holistic Look at Automated Blasting in the Modern Metal Fabrication Shop

Single-Source Supplier Helps Job Shop Operation Expand into New Markets

As a supplier of mass finishing and shot blasting equipment as well as consumables and service, Rosler understands the need for multi-faceted operations and the corresponding flexibility, cost-effectiveness, and innovation required to be successful.

B+S Metallbearbeitung GmbH (B+S), a job shop based in Southern Germany, also provides various surface finishing services. Its multi-faceted mass finishing operations include deburring and polishing as well as shot blasting, part cleaning, and packaging.

B+S handles a broad range of work pieces with different shapes, made of different materials, requiring different finishes, and coming from all kinds of industries. To create a streamlined and one-stop supplier, B+S chose to work with Rosler for its surface finishing equipment and consumables.

Continue reading Single-Source Supplier Helps Job Shop Operation Expand into New Markets

Shot Blasting 101

Shot blasting is a specialized surface finishing process where small metal (or mineral) pellets, called blast media, are thrown onto the surface of a work piece at incredibly high speeds. With rates of speed ranging from 200-800 feet per second, the impact on the work pieces from this process is what produces the desired surface finishing effect.

Shot blasting can help achieve surface cleaning, surface preparation, descaling, deburring, deflashing, and shot peening.

The process components of a shot blasting system include a shot blast machine, raw and finished work pieces, blast media, dust, and other byproducts. Rosler has more than 80 years of experience in developing comprehensive shot blasting systems.

The two most common types of shot blast machines are turbine blasting and air blasting.

Continue reading Shot Blasting 101

Testing & Expertise Overcome Shot Blasting Challenges

For nearly a decade, Sales Representative and Interim Product Manager of Turbine Blast Equipment Zack Murray has been one of Rosler’s top shot blasting experts. 

Working with customers and our global Customer Experience Centers, he helps develop and test surface finishing machines and media in addition to dialing in specific process parameters.

At times, adhering to the Rosler motto and guiding principle of “finding a better way…” can be difficult and complicated. Luckily, Murray and the entire Rosler team are committed to delivering world-class surface finishing equipment, consumables, and service in a variety of industries.

In this post, Murray shares the most challenging issue he has tackled at Rosler and how the team developed a solution.

Continue reading Testing & Expertise Overcome Shot Blasting Challenges

Blade Technology: Straight vs. Curved Blades Explained

As an expert in the shot blasting industry, Rosler knows about blade technology. All shot blasting machines require blades to propel media towards workpieces. While both straight and curved blades are used, each type offers advantages and disadvantages.

What are the Differences?

Straight blades are, as the name suggests, blades that do not have curvature when viewed from the side and do not possess tangential curvature with respect to the turbine. Curved blades are blades that have some degree of curvature when viewed from the side.

As the newer design, curved blades are generally better than straight blades, but they also have some drawbacks related to longevity, maintenance, and cost of ownership.

Continue reading Blade Technology: Straight vs. Curved Blades Explained

New Deflashing Equipment Assists 30-year Customer Increase Production

For over 30 years, Berker GmbH & Co KG (Berker) has trusted Rosler shot blasting equipment in its manufacturing processes.

A member of the Hager Group since 2010, Berker is one of the leading manufacturers of high-end electrical components, from timeless classical switches to intelligent electrical systems for buildings. The company also supplies switches for electrical appliances and automobiles.

The Situation

Berker primarily uses continuous feed systems such as loop and flat belt machines to deflash plastic components including switching elements, electrical outlet covers, frames, and more.

Increased production volume at its Wenden-Ottfingen manufacturing location led Berker to decide to invest in an additional shot blast machine in 2018. The new investment was intended to replace an existing continuous feed loop belt system with the latest deflashing technology.

Its specifications called for increased capacity and high equipment availability.

Continue reading New Deflashing Equipment Assists 30-year Customer Increase Production

Foundry-Specific Shot Blasting Achieves Increased Efficiency

Replacing a shot blasting machine for a long-time customer requires finding a better way to deliver efficient finishing in a faster, smaller, and more maintenance-friendly way. That’s exactly what Rosler delivered when Linde Material Handling (Linde) returned to us for a shot blasting upgrade.

Linde is a supplier of forklift trucks and warehouse equipment and also provides technical intralogistics solutions and services. With a sales and service network spanning more than 100 countries, the company has a global footprint.

For this particular partnership, Linde’s foundry in Weilbach, Germany, challenged Rosler to supply a new shot blasting system capable of finishing and maneuvering the counterweights it manufactures for forklifts. Our solution was a sturdy foundry version of a continuous hanger shot blast machine known as the RHBD 22/27-F.

The Situation

Linde continuously strives to improve its manufacturing operations. As such, the new machines had to accomplish several goals, including faster processing, more flexible material flow, optimized utilization of available space, improved access to all critical maintenance areas, and increased overall efficiency.

Continue reading Foundry-Specific Shot Blasting Achieves Increased Efficiency