Category Archives: Shot Blasting

Wet Blasting Technology, Part 2 – Comparing Attributes, Advantages to Dry Blasting

Unlike dry blasting in which only solid abrasive media is used, wet blasting processes use a slurry in which the media is embedded in water. This greatly cushions the impact energy on the work pieces, providing gentler, yet effective results for delicate work pieces.

As the utilization of wet blasting increases, Rosler reminds manufacturers to review their traditional, dry shot blasting applications and consider if wet blasting could provide additional efficiencies, reduced costs, and better results.

Understanding the Differences

Visual comparison of wet, dry shot, and dry grit blastings' impact on surfaces

As in any surface finishing process, the starting condition of the work piece, its material composition, shape, and final finish largely dictate which finishing application is most appropriate. Understanding how the application changes the work piece is a key consideration.

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Wet Blasting Technology, Part 1 – Wet Blasting Gently Delivers Dramatic Finishing Results

Thanks to its many technical advantages and “gentle” application, wet blasting is a versatile and fast-growing segment of the shot blasting field. Achieving precise, repeatable results with any wet blasting process requires understanding both its principles and real-world uses.

With decades of experience and the latest in engineering expertise, Rosler understands how to develop efficient wet blasting machines and consumables. Learn more about wet blasting technology as we begin our five-part Wet Blasting Technology Series.

How Does Wet Blasting Work?

Wet blasting is a water-based method of shot blasting utilizing abrasives that are particularly suited for the finishing of delicate, precision-produced parts.

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Automotive Supplier Achieves Process Stability, High Cost Efficiency with Modular Shot Peening System

For transmission components like gears and shafts, shot peening has become an indispensable step in the overall manufacturing process.  

With the RWT swing table machine, Rosler developed a modular equipment concept that can be easily adapted to different technical requirements and offers a maximum in process stability paired with absolutely repeatable peening results and high cost efficiency. One of the numerous customers within the automotive industry utilizing the RWT is an Asian automotive supplier.

The Need

As part of a capacity expansion for minivan transmissions, this customer increased annual production to 40,000 units and decided to carry out the required shot peening operation in-house instead of subcontracting it to an external job shop.

The specifications called for a system that can handle around 560,000 single work pieces per year, including 15 different types of gears and shafts. Each work piece type required the development of a specific peening program based on drawings and various work piece materials.

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Automotive Crankshafts, Part 1 – Cost-Effective Surface Improvement for Key Engine Components

Crankshafts are a key component of internal combustion engines, be it mass-produced engines for motorcycles and automobiles, engines for heavy trucks, off-high highway equipment, and even large ships.

Crankshafts convert the reciprocating (up/down) movement of the pistons/connecting rods into a rotational movement that drives the wheels and allows a vehicle to move forward.

Rosler Metal Finishing understands the vital importance of these engine components and has developed specific shot blasting and mass finishing machines to process these pieces to perfection.

A crankshaft with connected rods and pistons
A crankshaft with connected rods and pistons

Materials & Production Methods

Considering that automotive crankshafts weigh around 40-60 pounds and rotate approximately 100 times per second, these parts are exposed to tremendous tensile, compressive, and shear stresses. In addition, combustion forces and piston acceleration in an engine can also cause significant vibration.

Therefore, crankshafts must be made from tough, wear-resistant materials, usually high alloy carbon steel. Typical alloying elements are manganese, chromium, molybdenum, nickel, cobalt, or vanadium.

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Spinal Implants, Part 3 – Mass Finishing Versus Shot Blasting Methods

implanted spinal rods
Implanted spinal rods

With worldwide sales at nearly $10 billion annually, there is a high demand for spinal implants. These implants are subject to very specific and strict surface finishing requirements to ensure longevity and fixation to bone.

Mass finishing and shot blasting play key roles in creating the right finish for spinal implants, not only for intermediate surface treatment after forging, casting, machining, additive manufacturing, etc., but also for placing the final surface finish before implantation.

Let’s examine the capabilities of mass finishing and shot blasting for spinal implants and how Rosler Metal Finishing can develop a precise and repeatable finishing process to meet your unique challenges and goals.

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Forge & Foundry, Part 7 – Selecting a Shot Blasting Machine for Forgings, Non-Sand Castings, and Powdered Metal Components

This installment of Rosler Metal Finishing’s Forge and Foundry Series continues with shot blasting machine selection considerations for forgings, non-sand castings, and powdered metal components.

While none of these work pieces contain sand, their surfaces may show oxidization or – in the case of ferrous metals – heavy scale/rust caused by iron oxide.

All forms of oxidization must be removed to ensure that subsequent manufacturing operations such as machining, coating, and painting are economical and efficient. Poorly cleaned work pieces may cause additional processing, premature wear on milling tools and drill bits, excessive pollution within coolant systems, and inefficient adhesion of coatings and paint.

Traces of oxidation may also impact the work piece’s functionality.

Continue reading Forge & Foundry, Part 7 – Selecting a Shot Blasting Machine for Forgings, Non-Sand Castings, and Powdered Metal Components

Joint Reconstruction, Part 4 – Comparing Surface Finishing Methods

Shot blasting and mass finishing have become indispensable technologies for surface preparation and finishing of joint reconstruction implants. Their applications range from surface cleaning, deburring, edge radiusing after forging, casting, additive manufacturing, and machining to surface preparation for different kinds of coatings, shot peening for increasing the longevity of an implant, and placing an extremely smooth, high-gloss finish on the implants before they are inserted into the body.

Rosler Metal Finishing leverages its extensive experience in the medical industry to create customized solutions and equipment for the treatment of joint reconstruction implants.

This installment of the Joint Reconstruction Series will compare the working principles and features of utilizing shot blasting and mass finishing technologies for endoprosthetic implants.

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Forge & Foundry, Part 6 – Selecting a Shot Blasting Machine for Die Castings

Our Forge and Foundry Series continues with tips for selecting a shot blasting machine for die castings.

Considerations for machine selection include:

  • Are the work pieces sturdy enough to allow for somewhat more aggressive processing or must they be handled gently without any part-on-part contact?
  • Is batch processing possible or must it be continuous?
  • Which work piece handling system is best: rotary drum, troughed belt, wire mesh belt, or overhead monorail system?
  • Can the work pieces be handled by robot, etc.?

Rosler Metal Finishing builds shot blasting machines that are designed to expertly prepare the surface of delicate and sturdy die castings and everything in between. We can design a machine that is perfectly matched to your work piece and process.

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Forge & Foundry, Part 5 – Cleaning Features & Dust Precautions for Sand Castings

Our Forge and Foundry Series continues with a look at the cleaning required for sand castings and the collection of removed contaminants.  

Rosler Metal Finishing builds shot blasting machines that are equipped to prepare the surface of sand castings as well as collect removed contaminants for a consistent workpiece finish and the health of the utilized machine and personnel.

What design features must be considered in blast turbines used for the cleaning of sand castings?

Baked-on molding sand, sand cores, and scale/rust on the sand castings are difficult to remove and require turbines with a lot of fire power. Turbines with curved throwing blades, such as Rosler’s Gamma G series, have proven to be exceptionally effective since, compared to straight-bladed turbines, the curvature of the blades generates up to 25 percent higher throwing speeds!

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Joint Reconstruction, Part 2 – Material Standards

Joint reconstruction implants allow millions of individuals to regain mobility and reduce pain. Just as surgical skill is required to implant these artificial joints, so is skillful construction and finish of the joint components themselves.

A leader in surface finishing for medical technology, Rosler Metal Finishing has extensive experience in shot blasting and mass finishing a wide range of medical devices from instruments to implants used specifically for joint replacement.

Our Joint Reconstruction Series continues with an overview of the most common materials used for these endoprosthetic implants.

Material Standards

The most common materials used for joint reconstruction implants are currently titanium and titanium alloys and cobalt-chromium alloys. Both materials are very tough, corrosion-resistant, highly biocompatible, and have proven themselves to be absolutely reliable.

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