Shot Blast Tip 6 – Regularly Check Your Wear Parts In Your Shot Blast Machine

Wear parts in your shot blast machine are the: blades/vanes, control cage, impellor and side / top wear plates in the blast wheel(s) themselves and the wear protection plates in the blast zone (in the area calculated to have the most impact from the abrasive when it is thrown from the wheel).

Continue reading Shot Blast Tip 6 – Regularly Check Your Wear Parts In Your Shot Blast Machine

Shot Blast Tip 5 – Monitor Your Abrasive Removal Size In Your Shot Blast Machine

 

The blast media in your shot blast machine  is provided as a “working mix” to achieve your required process.  After a period of blast time it will not perform to the required standard as it has now reduced in size. If it remains in your machine, you can expect to increase the wear and degradation of the blast wheel components together with the recovery system of your machine.  It will increase production times and power consumption because of the longer blast duration required.  An efficient separator will remove unwanted contaminants and undersized media without carrying out good, usable abrasive. It is vital you regularly check the efficiency of your separator and the size at which media, fines and dust are being removed.

Click to read Tip No. 6 Regularly Check Your Wear Parts

 

For more information on Shot Blasting please visit www.rosler.com

Haydn Kitchen New APost written by
Haydn Kitchen
Shot Blasting Technical Manager

 

Shot Blast Tip 4 – Ensure Contaminants Are Removed From Your Shot Blast Machine

Just as abrasive circulates in your shot blast machine so will any contaminants that aren’t removed by screens (if fitted), by the air wash separator and/or dust collector.

When larger oversized particles are allowed to remain in the machine they can cause damage to the blast wheels (giving a high risk of blast wheel part breakage) and can affect the finish produced and process times adversely.

Click to read Tip No. 5 Monitor Your Abrasive Removal Size

 

For more information on Shot Blasting please visit www.rosler.com

Haydn Kitchen New APost written by
Haydn Kitchen
Shot Blasting Technical Manager

 

Shot Blast Tip 3 – Check That The Abrasive Condition Is Good In Your Shot Blast Machine

As abrasive is recycled and re-used within your shot blast machine it is affected by impact. It will gradually reduce  in size as a result of a combination of: splintering, spalling (peeling), deformation (i.e. rounding) or smoothing (i.e. grit becoming blunt).

Continue reading Shot Blast Tip 3 – Check That The Abrasive Condition Is Good In Your Shot Blast Machine

Shot Blast Tip 2 – Regularly Check That Your Abrasive Working Mix is Correct In Your Shot Blast Machine

Working Mix 2

Irrespective of the starting size of your media in your blast machine (i.e. S110, S230, etc…) within a very short time that media will reduce in size as a result of abrasion, deformation as a result of impact (i.e. rounding) and/or fracture/splintering. This will cause a drop in the abrasive level which needs to be topped up with new media (as per tip 1).

Continue reading Shot Blast Tip 2 – Regularly Check That Your Abrasive Working Mix is Correct In Your Shot Blast Machine

Shot Blast Tip 1 – Regularly Check That You Have Enough Abrasive In Your Shot Blast Machine

Standard (wheel) shot blasting machines It is critical you maintain a balanced abrasive particle size to obtain a consistent, quality finish. When a machine is first installed it should be filled with new abrasive constituting a “working mix” of different sizes of media.

Continue reading Shot Blast Tip 1 – Regularly Check That You Have Enough Abrasive In Your Shot Blast Machine

Mass Finishing Tip 9. Check Your Starting Condition Is The Same

Sometimes things change … including the starting condition of your parts. Worn tooling, changes in manufacturing methods or materials or investment in a new manufacturing machine can result in Mass Finishing Machine Tips Booklet_Page_5_Image_0002you no longer getting a result from your mass finishing machine like the one you have been used to and/or need. We would typically recommend a sample starting condition part is kept by the machine for reference each time parts are to be processed. Should the starting condition prove to be different often this can be accomMass Finishing Machine Tips Booklet_Page_5_Image_0003modated in the mass finishing process itself (i.e. extended time, changes in machine amplitude and drive power, different media, etc…). Should the change be dramatic though the mass finishing process will need to be re-evaluated. It may be that a different media, compound and/or setting will still get you there – and we’d be delighted to help make a recommendation for that using our process development service.

 

For more information on Mass Finishing please visit www.rosler.com

Steve Lewis-Brammer NewPost written by
Stephen Lewis-Brammer
General Manager

 

Shot Blasting and Mass Finishing Surface Finishing Experts

%d bloggers like this: