Tag Archives: Shot Blasting

Equipment Investment Doubles Work Piece Longevity at Andersen Steel

Andersen Steel produces agricultural equipment including grubbers, front packers, and stubble tillers equipped with vibration tines for soil cultivation. Their equipment is exposed to extreme loads, causing decreased wear life of parts including the tines.

Made using specially arched rolled steel at the company’s Poland plant, Andersen Steel tasked engineers at Rosler with finding a better way to process the tines and improve their wear life. We delivered a solution in the form of two identical machines for blast cleaning and shot peening.

Delivering a Solution

Compared to flat steel, the rounded edges of the material Andersen uses prevent small cracks from forming during the shaping process. The work pieces pass through a blast machine to remove mill scale and other contaminants before shot peening to further improve their wear resistance.

For these dual shot blasting requirements, Rosler suggested two identical Rosler RHBD 13/18 K hanger machines. Successful blasting trials in a Rosler test center helped Andersen realize the advantages of purchasing these Rosler machines by demonstrating that shot peening the work pieces doubled the uptime of the tines.

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Surface Preparation Standards, Part 2 – Dust Measurements and Considerations

As an expert in the surface finishing industry, Rosler knows that all the expertise in the world won’t do any good if the surface of the work piece is not properly prepared.

When it comes to structural steel, we receive many questions about preparation. Among the most common questions is, “How is the presence of dust on shot-blasted structural steel components evaluated?”

Understanding dust considerations and mitigation will help produce higher quality and longer-lasting structural steel components more cost-effectively and safely.

The Dangers of Dust

Blast-cleaned structural steel surfaces must be completely free of dust to ensure proper coating and painting. Residual dust will reduce the adhesion of subsequently applied coatings and, by absorbing moisture, may promote the corrosion of the blast‐cleaned steel surfaces.

The potential accumulation of dust is especially critical on horizontal surfaces, the interior of pipes, and inside structural cavities. Special inspections must be carried out to ensure that such areas are adequately cleaned and free from dust before painting.

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Surface Preparation Standards, Part 1 – Evaluating Surfaces Throughout Finishing Processes

Surface preparation can account for up to 40 percent of structural steel painting and repainting jobs and the life of anti‐corrosion coatings on a steel surface largely depend on how thoroughly the surface was prepared before painting.

At Rosler, we have extensive experience evaluating structural steel surfaces for coating before and after shot blasting. This knowledge of surface preparation standards and the widely used ISO and SSPC standards guide us in developing systems to expertly prepare and repair structural steel throughout its lifespan.

The Standards

Evaluating rust and mill scale pre- and post-shot blasting is a must. It is important to clearly specify the quality of the surface prior to preparation as well as the surface conditions after preparation. As a result, standards were developed to visually assess the initial surface conditions and the quality of the required surface preparation relative to the initial steel surface conditions.

The dominant and widely used standards for evaluating rust and mill scale are ISO 8501‐1:2007 (based on the Swedish Standard SIS 05 59 00) and the SSPC (Steel Structures Painting Council). While different in some minor details, these standards are practically identical.

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Orthopedic Implants, Part 3 – Materials Must Provide Strength, Safety

For millions of individuals, orthopedic implants provide the ability to regain mobility and reduce pain. Just as surgical skill is required to implant these artificial joints, so is skillful construction and finish of the joint components themselves.

A leader in surface finishing for medical technologyRosler has extensive experience in shot blasting and mass finishing a wide range of medical devices from instruments to implants used specifically for joint replacement.

Our Orthopedic Implant Series continues with an overview of the most common materials used for these endoprosthetic implants.

Popular Materials

To date, the most common materials have been titanium, titanium alloys, and cobalt-chromium alloys. Both materials are very tough, resistant to corrosion, highly biocompatible, and absolutely reliable.

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Wet Blasting Equipment & Media, Part 1 – Machines Range in Complexity, Uses

Because of its many technical advantages and versatility, wet blasting is the fastest-growing segment in the field of shot blasting.

As with dry blasting, the available scope of wet blasting machinery ranges from simple, low-cost blast cabinets to sophisticated, partially or fully automated systems. Customers can choose between a wide spectrum of standard wet blasting equipment, however, for certain applications, special custom-engineered systems may offer the most efficient and cost-effective solution.

The machine type is usually determined by the processing task, the size and shape of the work pieces, and the desired degree of automation. Frequently, multi-axis robots are used for work piece handling or guiding the blast gun movement.

Rosler has extensive experience in wet blasting technology and the development of customized solutions. We have even developed the Rosler PureFinish® system for cleaning stainless steel components for the chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries through wet blasting. This system cleans the work piece surface while facilitating cleaning, sterilization, and prohibiting bacterial growth.

Learn more about common types of wet blasting systems and examples of machine use for a glimpse into the technical capabilities wet blasting offers.

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Shot Blasting, Peening Offer Aerospace Advantages

Critical aerospace components require first-class surface treatment. From engines, fuselage, wings, and landing gear to seats, gears, propellers, blades, fasteners and tanks for fuel, water, and waste, Rosler has industry experience and expertise.

While mass finishing and shot blasting methods are equally useful to manufacturers of new components and in the overhaul and repair of existing components, shot peening – a particular type of shot blasting – is especially advantageous for aerospace work pieces thanks to its ability to provide surface finishing and create internal compressive stress for improved component life.

Shot Blasting Capabilities

Rosler’s shot blasting technology meets the strict surface finishing requirements predicated by tight tolerances for safety and longevity. This impact-based process propels small metal or mineral pellets onto a work surface at speeds of 200-800 feet per second.

Desired finishes including cleaning, texturing, removal of or preparation for coating, and peening can be pinpointed to specific areas of a given work piece as well as the entirety of large, structural components.

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Orthopedic Implants, Part 1 – Surface Finishing Enhances Component Life, Function

Fueled by more active lifestyles and increased life expectancy,the market for knee, hip, and other replacement body jointsis on the rise. With more than $19 billion in annual worldwidesales, implants for joint reconstruction make up nearly 40 percentof all orthopedic product sales.

Thanks to significant advancements in materials and new or improvedsurface finishing technologies, today’s artificial hips andknees can last more than 20 years, giving the recipient decadesof comfort and agility.

Parts that are finished using modern mass finishing and shot blasting methods play a key role in extending the lifespan of orthopedic implants.

Rosler has extensive experience in these processes which often include cleaning, deburring/edge radiusing, surface smoothing, post-casting surface preparation, machining, CNC grinding, and, of course, final finishing. These finishing technologies make big differences in the quality and performance of such products.

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Preservation Lines Deliver Multi-Step Surface Finishing in a Single Machine

Complete systems for blast cleaning and placing a protective coating, preservation lines are extremely useful on plates and profiles that require multiple treatments.

For example, structural steel components are commonly processed by preservation lines because they are prone to rust quickly and fail with potentially catastrophic consequences if not covered with a suitable, protective coating.

Rosler has extensive experience preparing structural steel components for use in constructionshipbuilding, and the production of all kinds of heavy-duty vehicles, trucks, railway vehicles, agricultural implements, or construction equipment. We understand the importance of applying proper surface finishing processes to these components for safety and longevity.

Offering shot blasting, painting, and more in a single source, preservation lines are a great option for a variety of industries, especially those utilizing structural steel components including steel plates, beams, round bar stock, and tubes.

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wet blasting technology, part 4 – typical wet blasting applications

Wet blasting can do nearly any job that is done with dry shot blasting. The defining differences are that wet blasting does so more gently and without producing dust. In addition, wet blasting can handle a small amount of oil and grease unlike dry blasting.

At Rosler, we have more than 80 years’ experience in surface finishing. While wet blasting has gained popularity recently, we’ve used this technique to provide precise, repeatable results to a number of industries over the years.

Typical Applications

With proper testing and process parameters, wet blasting can achieve numerous surface finishing goals.

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Wet Blasting Technology, Part 3 – Technical Features, Slurry Control Achieve Precise Finishing

Numerous technical features combine to make wet blasting an effective method of surface finishing.

When expertly combined by an experienced finishing expert such as Rosler, this method can achieve precise and repeatable results on a variety of work pieces from a wide range of industries.

A general understanding of the essential technical elements of a wet blasting machine will help you select a machine for your specific needs as well as prolonging the efficiency and life of existing wet blasting equipment.

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